Research

AHS-ND or “Healthy Places ND” is currently focusing on several internally and externally funded projects:

School cafeteria design: Cafeteria Assessment for Elementary Schools

Kim Rollings (University of Notre Dame) & Nancy Wells (Cornell University)


The Cafeteria Assessment for Elementary Schools (CAFES) is a valid, reliable, and objective tool that quantifies physical attributes of cafeteria environments linked to selection and consumption of fruits and vegetables (FV).  Cafeteria design – from individual foods and plates to serving displays, furniture, and interior design – can affect what students’ select and consume during school meals, in addition to policies affecting food access and school siting which are difficult to change.  CAFES generates scores linked to low- and no-cost intervention suggestions schools can immediately implement and improve students’ diets.  The CAFES project is contributing to the development of evidence-based cafeteria design guidelines and was presented at EDRA 2013 in Providence, RI; ISBNPA 2014 in San Diego, CA; IAPS 2016 in Lund, Sweden, and EDRA 2017 as part of an NCCOR-sponsored symposium.

Funding: USDA-FNS People’s Garden pilot program (Project CN-CGP-11-0047); Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Active Living Research Program (ID #69550); Cornell Center for Behavioral Economics in Child Nutrition; Design & Environmental Analysis, Cornell University; United Way of St. Joseph County; University of Notre Dame Office of Research Initiation Grant; University of Notre Dame School of Architecture

Rollings, K.A. (2017). Informing design guidelines for healthy eating in schools: Development of the Cafeteria Assessment for Elementary Schools (CAFES) tool. In: Healthy Places: Using Behavioral Design to Enhance Active Living and Healthy Eating—An NCCOR Sponsored Symposium. 48th Conference of the Environmental Design Research Association (EDRA): Madison, WI.

Rollings, K.A. & Wells, N.M. (2016). Cafeteria Assessment for Elementary Schools (CAFES): Measuring environmental features that influence children’s diet. In: Creating Healthy School Environments Symposium. 24th Conference of the International Association for People-Environment Studies. Lund, Sweden.

Rollings, K.A. & Wells, N.M. (2014). Cafeteria assessment for elementary schools: Scale development. 2014 Annual Meeting of the International Society for Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity: San Diego, CA.

Rollings, K.A., Wells, N.M., & Demment, M. (2013). Cafeteria Assessment for Elementary Schools: Instrument Development. In: Environmental Influences on Children’s Diet and Physical Activity at School: Innovative Measurement Strategies Symposium. 44th Conference of the Environmental Design Research Association: Providence, RI.

Neighborhood design & children’s mental health

Kim Rollings (University of Notre Dame), Gary Evans (Cornell University), Nancy Wells  (Cornell University), Yizhao Yang (U. Oregon), Amanda Bednarz (U. Oregon)


Research findings generally suggest an association between living in deprived neighborhoods and poor health outcomes, but often define neighborhoods by socioeconomic status.  Specific physical neighborhood attributes related to these health outcomes are not typically identified. In addition to individual factors and housing, neighborhoods have emerged as relevant contexts when examining environmental influences on health.  This project is developing a tool to assess physical neighborhood quality in ways conceptually relevant to children’s mental health and stress.  Physical neighborhood environment variables include: noise, air pollution, neighborhood stability (e.g., vacant units, turnover), neighborhood buildings (damaged houses, year built), sidewalk condition, land use mix, density, street connectivity, proximity to resources, and nearby nature.  An initial index has been developed by the authors using longitudinal data collected from rural children; now, AHS-ND is working to validate the index in urban areas with the aim of informing design practitioners and policy makers. This type of evidence about the connection between the built environment and health can add authority to design proposals.

Rollings, K.A., Wells, N.M., Evans, G.W., Bednarz, A.E. & Yang, Y.Y (2017). Housing and neighborhood physical quality: Children’s mental health and motivation. Journal of Environmental Psychology, 50, 17-23. doi: 10.1016/j.jenvp.2017.01.004

Rollings, K.A., Wells, N.M., & Evans, G.W. (2015). Measuring physical neighborhood quality related to health. Behavioral Sciences, 5(2), 190-202. doi: 10.3390/bs5020190

Rollings, K.A., Wells, N.M., & Evans, G.W. (2014). Potential Design Moderators of the Residential Crowding–Psychological Health and Crowding-Physiological Stress Relations Among Children. 45th Conference of the Environmental Design Research Association: New Orleans, LA.

Rollings, K.A., Wells, N.M., Yang, Y., Bednarz, A., Vaid, U., & Evans, G.W. (2012). Measuring Physical Neighborhood Quality. 43rd Conference of the Environmental Design Research Association: Seattle, WA.

Funding: Cornell University, John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation; University of Notre Dame Office of Research Initiation Grant; University of Notre Dame School of Architecture

Permanent Supportive Housing

Kim Rollings (University of Notre Dame)


Permanent supportive housing (PSH or “supportive housing”) serves people who require long-term housing assistance with supportive services in order to remain housed. PSH links decent, safe, affordable, community-based housing with voluntary support services that address various challenges associated with chronic homelessness such as addiction and other physical and mental impairments, including serious mental illness. Housing allows this population to address underlying and often untreated conditions while having a stable housing option with supportive services. AHS-ND is working to identify best design practices for PSH facilities.

http://news.nd.edu/news/architecture-students-to-present-plans-for-new-south-bend-housing-project/

Rollings, K.A. (2017). Participatory design research and adults with mental illness. 48th Conference of the Environmental Design Research Association: Madison, WI.

Rollings, K.A. (2016). Housing the chronically homeless: Opportunities and challenges of a community-based design studio. Building for Health and Well-Being: 2016 Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture (ACSA) and Association of Schools and Programs of Public Health (ASPPH) First Joint Conference. Honolulu, HI.

Funding: Ganey Mini-Grant, University of Notre Dame Center for Social Concerns; University of Notre Dame School of Architecture

Nature and the Built Environment


Wells, N.M., Rollings, K.A., Ong, A.D., Reid, M.C. (revise and resubmit). Nearby nature buffers the pain catastrophizing – pain intensity relation among those with chronic pain. Environment and Behavior.

Rollings, K.A. (submitted for review) GREEN: Development and testing of an objective method to quantify nearby nature. Environment and Behavior.

Lipscomb, M. & Rollings, K.A. (submitted for review). Influences of indoor plants on psychological well-being and memory task performance in a workplace setting. Perkins + Will Research Journal.

Wells, N.M. & Rollings, K.A. (2012). The natural environment: Influences on human health and function. In Clayton, S. (Ed.). The Oxford Handbook of Environmental and Conservation Psychology. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

Rollings, K.A. & Wells, N.M. (2012). Objectively Quantifying Nearby Nature: Landcover Data and GIS v. Manually-Rated Satellite Images. 43rd Conference of the Environmental Design Research Association: Seattle, WA.

Wells, N.M., Rollings, K.A., Ong, A.D., & Reid, M. (2012). Nature as a Buffer of Pain: Nearby Nature Moderates the Relation between Pain Catastrophizing and Chronic Pain Intensity among Older Adults. 43rd Conference of the Environmental Design Research Association: Seattle, WA.

 

 

 

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